The Piscene Rainforest: Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail 45

Take a Moment to Listen to William Bartram’s Travels regarding the Broad and Oconee River:

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Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee…

Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee comprise a Piscine Rainforest of sorts, wherein the diversity of terrain, from mountains, to hills, to plains, to coast, and the continual warmth of the waters have contrived to provide habitat for a diversity of fish that rivals the diversity of trees in the rainforests of the Amazon.

Turquoise Darters…

The deep slow moving waters of the Oconee by the Botanical Gardens in Athens Georgia contrasted with the rapids and shoals of the Broad allow for very different habitats for very different types of fish. Here is possibly the best picture I have of a Turquoise Darter, captured for a photograph out of a creek in Georgia. I took pictures of the fish for my Senior Portfolio in college, and the Turquoise Darter was the first fish I caught.

 

Turquoise Darter from Georgia Creek in Madison County.

Turquoise Darter from Georgia Creek in Madison County.

The Seasons of the River…

The seasons on the river are amazing. In my years of hiking the Botanical Gardens I have managed to capture the Oconee River in all the different Seasons.

November, the leaves have changed colors, but have yet to fall from the trees, and the brilliant blue skies overhead are reflected on the water.

Oconee at Botanical Gardens, November. From Beth's Travels on the Bartram Trail.

Oconee at Botanical Gardens, November. From Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail.

A Possible Perception

of the Oconee in November…

Oconee in November Possible Perception, built from the image above it.

Oconee in November Possible Perception, built from the image above it.

February, with no leaves on the trees at all, and the chill of the air is reflected in the water’s surface.

Oconee in February, Beth's Travels on the Bartram Trail.

Oconee in February, Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail.

 

April, where everything is beginning to bud and blossom, and this giant poplar on the river’s edge hangs over a river run red and muddy from all the spring’s rains.

Oconee in April, from Beth's Travels on the Bartram Trail

Oconee in April, from Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail

Finally, May, the river is still full and muddy-red from the rain, but the trees have grown lush and green, hanging over the waters, with a deep promise of summer.

Oconee in May, from Beth's Travels on the Bartram Trail.

Oconee in May, from Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail.

The Broad River, so called from it lying flat and wide in the land as you can see from the picture below, I haven’t had the pleasure of exploring through the seasons. However, I have had the pleasure of Kayaking down the river, my camera tied to the kayak bow in a dry-bag.

Broad, Flat and Wide, from Beth's Travels on the Bartram Trail.

Broad, Flat and Wide, from Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail.

While I didn’t capture any pyramidal hills of crawfish homes, or golden fish flying like lightening from the crawfish, I did capture the sunbeams dancing on the rushing water like miniature bolts of lightening.

Sun Dance on Broad River. from Beth's Travels on the Bartram Trail.

Sun Dance on Broad River. from Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail.

The rapids were at once fun and scary to run in the kayak. Below is a picture of one rapid, the sky reflected blue off the not-quite-transparent waters.

Broad River Rapids from Beth's Travels on the Bertram Trail

Broad River Rapids from Beth’s Travels on the Bertram Trail

And from that image, a Possible Perception of the Broad, below.

Possible Perception of the Broad River, from Beth's Travels on the Bartram Trail.

Possible Perception of the Broad River, from Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail.

*Opening Stanza of Reading from song “The Slacks” by Trip Shakespeare. 

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