Terebinthine Pine Forest Morn: Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail 54

Take a moment to listen to William Bartram’s words describing dawn in a longleaf pine forest:

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Longleaf Sentinels at Dawn by Beth Thompson: Beth's Travels on the Bartram Trail Series.

Longleaf Sentinels at Dawn by Beth Thompson: Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail Series.

A month in motion:

Thanksgiving month saw my husband and I in motion. Visiting 4 Georgia state parks in our trusty travel trailer, we went from the Northeastern corner of the state to the Southwestern corner of the state. Seminole State Park of Georgia grabbed my attention as having a large longleaf pine forest contained within its boundaries. We arrived at dusk and set up camp.

Moonlight through the Pines by Beth Thompson: Beth's Travels on the Bartram Trail Series

Moonlight through the Pines by Beth Thompson: Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail Series

Moonrise…

The moon rose shortly after dinner, and shone brightly through the long needles of the pines, from whence they gained their name. Racing clouds added a dynamic to my long exposures.

Sunrise…

Waking before dawn the following day I watched as the sun came up over the horizon. The tops of Bartram’s terebinthine pines, standing tall, were the first to catch the sun’s rays. Thus I experienced the same gilding of the pines with gold that Bartram spoke of centuries ago.

Sun-gilded Pine by Beth Thompson: Beth's Travels on the Bartram Trail Series

Sun-gilded Pine by Beth Thompson: Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail Series

Resounds in the skies…

All of a sudden, I heard an awful racket! From not too distant came a flock of birds, a huge flock, and they were racing right over me, talking and chattering the whole way! With but a few moments notice, I readjusted my camera to point straight up and…

Dawn Chatterbirds by Beth Thompson: Beth's Travels on the Bartram Trail Series

Dawn Chatterbirds by Beth Thompson: Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail Series

An Arch of Longleaf Pines…

The Pines around the campsite backed up to a pond. With the sun rising behind them they framed the landscape with an arch of silhouettes.

Arch of longleaf silhouettes at dawn by Beth Thompson: Beth's Travels on the Bartram Trail Series

Arch of longleaf silhouettes at dawn by Beth Thompson: Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail Series

Transformation…

The image above became the Possible Perception below….

Longleaf Dawn Possible Perception by Beth Thompson

Longleaf Dawn Possible Perception by Beth Thompson

*Opening Stanza of reading by Trip Shakespeare

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Tinkering with Nature: Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail 53

Why can’t we stop tinkering with nature?

cries fellow photographer and scientific illustrator,  OC Carlisle.

Bartram’s very words at the beginning of his book are:

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Gossypium

Gossypium for clothing, Dawson, GA

Gifts from God….

Plants, therefore, were viewed as a gift from the Creator, placed in our world for sustenance, amusement, and delight. The concept of an invasive species had yet to appear on the horizon. So the Bartrams’, among many others, went tinkering away. They were not alone in humanity, and in their tinkering they did actually preserve the Franklin Tree from complete extinction. Yet tinkering perhaps endangered the Franklinia in the first place, along with the chestnuts.

Franklin Tree, Bartram's Garden, Philadelphia, PA

Franklin Tree, Bartram’s Garden, Philadelphia, PA

Poison from the New World…

Tinkering also led to the export of a poisonous exotic, straight from the New World, poison ivy. Arriving in one of Bartram’s Boxes in Great Britain, I heard from a recent tourist it has been spotted on the campus of Oxford, in a bed of English ivy, which is itself an invasive species in the United States. Tit for tat, apparently. I prefer English ivy to poison ivy in the garden. At least when I rip out English ivy I don’t itch for days afterward.

 

English Ivy Invading Oconee Forest, Athens, GA

English Ivy Invading Oconee Forest, Athens, GA

What could have been

William Bartram’s niece, Ann Bartram Carr, had a rockin’ business in the 1800’s importing exotics and growing Native American species. Thus her business could have been part of the import of a water mold, Phytophthora cinnamomi, to the United States. Combined with the South’s over-farming for cotton, the P. cinnamomi colonized first in exhausted fields of Gossypium, or cotton, and then naturalized in the Southern forests, killing all susceptible species in its path. Thus that very water mold caused Bartram’s Franklin Tree and the chestnut tree to go extinct in the wilds of Georgia.

Cotton Field in South GA

Cotton Field in South GA

Defining Invasive Species….

Of course, there may be one more invasive species on the continents of Asia, Europe, North America, and South America that we have yet to mention. Many many centuries ago, a cell made a bargain with a bacteria, and a mitochondria was born on the continent of Africa. Descendants carrying that mitochondria spread out over the entirety of the earth, invading the land, changing it everywhere they went, and celebrating those changes as science, art, language, civilization, culture, religion.

Taming Pegasus at Brookgreen Gardens, Myrtle Beach, SC

Taming Pegasus at Brookgreen Gardens, Myrtle Beach, SC

Described by Hamlet….

“What a piece of work is a man! How noble in reason, how infinite in faculty! In form and moving how express and admirable! In action how like an Angel! in apprehension how like a god! The beauty of the world! The paragon of animals! And yet to me, what is this quintessence of dust?”
~Shakespeare, Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, Act II, Scene 2

Don Quixote, Brookgreen Gardens, Myrtle Beach, SC. Sculpture by Anna Hyatt Huntington

Don Quixote, Brookgreen Gardens, Myrtle Beach, SC. Sculpture by Anna Hyatt Huntington

What power is this?

Can our human culture set right its wrongs?  Can we use the tools of science, art, language, the tools of our culture, to conserve, make right, restore the environment and climate we have impacted by our very presence?

Poison Ivy Pine, Ben Burton Park, Athens, GA

Poison Ivy Pine, Ben Burton Park, Athens, GA

Quintessence of Dust….

Or are we but specks of dust, jousting with a giant, powerless over the course of Nature, powerless even to the ways in which we do impact the environment? Just one more species surviving on the face of the planet?

Poison Ivy Pine Possible Perception by Beth Thompson

Poison Ivy Pine Possible Perception by Beth Thompson

 * Opening Stanza from “The Slacks” by Trip Shakespeare

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Streams Murmur in the Piedmont: Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail 52

William Bartram's Desk, Bartram's Gardens, Philadelphia, PA by Beth Thompson

William Bartram’s Desk, Bartram’s Gardens, Philadelphia, PA by Beth Thompson

Take a moment to listen to Wordsworth’s words from his poem “Ruth: Or The Influences of Nature”, inspired by William Bartram’s book Travels.

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Cherokee Country

Cherokee Country by Beth Thompson

A Youth from Georgia’s Shore…

“ There came a youth from Georgia’s shore—
A military casque he wore        
With splendid feathers drest;
He brought them from the Cherokees;
The feathers nodded in the breeze
And made a gallant crest.”
~”Ruth”, William Wordsworth

As I am uncertain which bird’s feathers the Cherokees wore in the time of Bartram, I have used this image of Cherokee country in North Carolina (above), to illustrate the verse.

“The moon, the glory of the sun,
And streams that murmur as they run
Had been his dearest joy.”
~”Ruth”, William Wordsworth

Running Stream

Running Stream by Beth Thompson

While much has changed down South since Bartram’s visit, the streams still murmur as they run, especially here in the Piedmont. The image above is of the stream at Ben Burton Park in Athens GA. The green color comes from the plants growing underwater anchored to rocks. The circle of light is the sun reflecting off the water.

“Among the Indians he had fought;
And with him many tales he brought
Of pleasure and of fear;        
Such tales as, told to any maid
By such a youth, in the green shade,
Were perilous to hear. “
~”Ruth”, William Wordsworth

As William was raised a Quaker, he did not fight in the Revolutionary War, not with the Indians or anyone else. However, he was quite adapt at finding green shade to rest in!

”He told of girls, a happy rout!
Who quit their fold with dance and shout,
Their pleasant Indian town,
To gather strawberries all day long;
Returning with a choral song
When daylight is gone down.”
~”Ruth”, William Wordsworth

Dancing Nymphs: Possible Perception 6040 by Beth Thompson

Dancing Nymphs: Possible Perception 6040 by Beth Thompson

These fleeting Cherokee maidens of the mountains, Bartram’s Innocently Jocose Sylvan Nymphs, I discovered in Alabama at Jasmine Hill Gardens, forever frozen into Greek statuary, complete with the watchful eyes of the older Heras, and forever hotblooded lad, caught in time, in sculpture. Bartram’s comments on this event are in “Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail 17“.

Ogeechee Lime Possible Perception by Beth Thompson

Ogeechee Lime Possible Perception by Beth Thompson

“He spake of plants that hourly change        
Their blossoms, through a boundless range
Of intermingling hues;
With budding, fading, faded flowers,
They stand the wonder of the bowers
From morn to evening dews.”
~”Ruth”, William Wordsworth

I suppose that the flowers didn’t actually change hues hourly, but if one were reading quickly through William Bartram’s Travels, the flowers might seem to change that rapidly.

Wild Azalea: Possible Perception 6047 by Beth Thompson

Wild Azalea: Possible Perception 6047 by Beth Thompson

“He told of the magnolia, spread
High as a cloud, high over head!

Magnolia Cathedral Possible Perception by Beth Thompson

Magnolia Cathedral Possible Perception by Beth Thompson

The cypress and her spire;

Cypress Swamp  $450

Cypress Swamp Possible Perception by Beth Thompson

—Of flowers that with one scarlet gleam
Cover a hundred leagues, and seem        
To set the hills on fire. “
~”Ruth”, William Wordsworth

Savannah Possible Perception 6038 by Beth Thompson

Savannah Possible Perception 6038 by Beth Thompson

“The youth of green savannahs spake,
And many an endless, endless lake

With all its fairy crowds
Of islands, that together lie
As quietly as spots of sky
Among the evening clouds.”
~”Ruth”, William Wordsworth

Evening Clouds by Beth Thompson

Evening Clouds by Beth Thompson

“And all the while,’ said he, ‘to know
That we were in a world of woe,
On such an earth as this!’ “
~”Ruth”, William Wordsworth

Erosion due to Overfarming in SW Georgia by Beth Thompson

Erosion due to Over-farming in SW Georgia by Beth Thompson

Bartram may have already seen the impact of the settlers upon the land during his Peregrinations from North to South and back again. Certainly he was aware of the mistreatment of the Native Peoples. How that mistreatment carried on to present day is the subject of my blog post “The Sacrament of the Land“.

Remains of a Cherokee Village in Franklin, NC by Beth Thompson

Remains of a Cherokee Village in Franklin, NC by Beth Thompson

During my journeys along the Bartram Trail I photographed many of the same plants, animals, and landscapes Bartram saw, but the landscapes were fractured by the human populations living in close proximity to the wild spaces.

Redbud at Bartram's Gardens, Philadelphia, PA by Beth Thompson

Redbud at Bartram’s Gardens, Philadelphia, PA by Beth Thompson

Furthermore, our consumer society is becoming more and more addicted to the quick fix of having that Thing, that shiny Thing hanging in the window of the store, advertised on TV, etc. This fixation on consuming is having devastating consequences on the natural and wild environments as resources are being plundered without regard to who lives downstream.

Fordham Rd, Bronx, before the street sweepers, by Beth Thompson

Fordham Rd, Bronx, before the street sweepers, by Beth Thompson

 

In a lecture ( “A Cherokee Looks at William Bartram,” ) by Cherokee Language Professor Tom Belt during the 2013 Bartram Trail Conference, he said “We all live downstream.”

Downstream, Oconee River from Ben Burton Park, Athens, GA by Beth Thompson

Downstream, Oconee River from Ben Burton Park, Athens, GA by Beth Thompson

So yes, as the poem “Ruth: Or the Influences of Nature” expresses, we live in a “world of woe”. Yet in my journeys, I saw lots of hope too. Portions of the Bartram Trail are preserved, plants he discovered live on in places, creatures he wrote about thrive in the backwater ways far from the crowds of civilization, and sometimes up close and personal to civilization.

Egrets roosting, Skidaway Is, Savannah, GA by Beth Thompson

Egrets roosting, Skidaway Is, Savannah, GA by Beth Thompson

Most of all, William Bartram’s incredible account of his early exploration of the American Southeastern states lives on. His words remind us of what has been lost, and what we can yet regain. His book has inspired nature writers down through the centuries, from when it was first published to 250 years later.

Bertram's Garden Magnolia Possible Perception by Beth Thompson

Bartram’s Garden Magnolia Possible Perception by Beth Thompson

* Opening Stanza from ” The Slacks” by Trip Shakespeare

The End

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Meaningful Migrations: Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail 51

Take a moment to listen to William Bartram’s account of migratory birds, between Philadelphia and Georgia, as observed by him 250 years ago.

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Silhouette of Mallard Mother in the Rain

Silhouette of Mallard Mother in the Rain, Augusta, GA: Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail

250 Years Ago…

250 years ago a man migrated south from Philadelphia. His was The Migration of his life, and his account of this migration, Travels, would shape the literature about Nature, the poets of his time, the settlement of the Southeast, and the names of plants growing in the Southeastern United States, forevermore.

Native Azalea, Oconee Forest, Athens GA: From Beth's Travels on the Bartram Trail.

Native Azalea, Oconee Forest, Athens GA: From Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail.

250 Years Later….

250 years later, I found one of the migratory birds mentioned begging for food in Philadelphia. Quite fearlessly, a mallard couple introduced themselves to me and my beloved on the Philadelphia piers in May. Whether they had recently arrived from a more Southern climate they couldn’t say.

Philly Mallard Couple: Philadelphia Piers: Beth's Travels on the Bartram Trail

Philly Mallard Couple: Philadelphia Piers: Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail

Migrating in the Footsteps of a Giant…

You see, I have traveled in the footsteps of a giant, William Bartram, for 3 years now. My migration has not perhaps been as exciting, however, I have run into alligators, South American Vultures, and entered into the Okefenoqua Swamp in Search of the Daughters of the Sun. Recently Alligators swarming has been captured on video, proving Bartram’s account of the same to be true, and King Vultures have been found in the fossil record in Florida.

South American Vultures, outside Charleston, SC in Birds of Prey Center: Beth's Travels on the Bartram Trail

South American Vultures, outside Charleston, SC in Birds of Prey Center: Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail

Diving and Re-Emerging…

Sadly, the Florida aquifer has been depleted, so the great fountain that inspired Coleridge in an Opium Dream while reading Travels is a mere upwelling of water, however, colorful fish dive into the opening and re-emerge still.

Fish in Crevice, Florida Spring: Beth's Travels on the Bartram Trail

Fish in Crevice, Florida Spring: Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail

Ubiquitous Philly Mallards…

Yet leave it to the lowly Mallard Duck, common, ubiquitous, and always begging for stale bread, to connect the wildlife of the Southeast to the wildlife of Bartram’s hometown, Philadelphia.

Mallards Flying, Philadelphia Piers: Beth's Travels on the Bartram Trail.

Mallards Flying, Philadelphia Piers: Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail.

Metropolis of Georgia Mallard Mother…

Here’s a Mallard Family in Bartram’s Great Metropolis of Georgia, Augusta, hanging around and posing for the camera in the hopes of a hand out….

Mallard Mother, Rainy Day in Augusta, GA: Beth's Travels on the Bartram Trail

Mallard Mother, Rainy Day in Augusta, GA: Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail

 

Finally, here is a Possible Perception of Mallard Mother and her brood, taken from the image above. I have to say, the computer doesn’t do this image any favors, so please come and check out the print at my show at the Botanical Gardens Fall of 2015!

Mallard Mother, by Beth Thompson, Possible Perception Series

Mallard Mother, by Beth Thompson, Possible Perception Series

 

 

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Bee, Spider, Lizard, Hibiscus: Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail 50

Year 2011.  I sat on the wooden floor of a friend’s 5 Points Loft apartment in Athens GA. In my hands was a copy of William Bartram’s Travels, just checked out from the library. Did I want to do a blog series with this book, this man, as my muse and guide? Or was it just a passing fancy, an idea to be played with then put away as too expensive, to time consuming, too risky, too much? Then I read aloud to my two friends the following passage from the Introduction:

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Bee & Wisteria by Beth Thompson: from Beth's Travels on the Bartram Trail

Bee & Wisteria by Beth Thompson: from Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail

Intense…

“Whoa Dude! That was really intense!” my friend exclaimed. Nodding, the other friend and she went back to packing, moving, focusing on the tasks of the day before them. I went home with Bartram’s words singing in my head and talking to my heart, and had a powerful dream. I was standing before a giant hibiscus flower, larger than life, larger than me, and it beckoned me to enter.

Hibiscus Flowers by Beth Thompson: from Beth's Travels on the Bartram Trail

Hibiscus Flowers by Beth Thompson: from Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail

Except….

When I woke up, the project no longer seemed too much. It was real, and one of the blog posts would be about that plant growing on the beach, that bee, that spider, and the future repast of a lizard yet to materialize. All I really needed was to go to Jekyll Island when the spiders are mating, August, and capture it all with my camera. Right?
Except, when I went to Jekyll, while my grandfather was still living, I photographed the Sea Turtle Rescue Center and never even visited the beach in search of bee-hunting spiders. It was cool and very windy. When I returned to Jekyll last year, I focused on the driftwood.

Jekyll Island Driftwood, by Beth Thompson

Jekyll Island Driftwood, by Beth Thompson

Except, when I finally did get a close up of a spider, it was on my trip to the Birds of Prey Center to photograph Sky Kings, vultures, for Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail, not spiders.

Spider by Beth Thompson: from Beth's Travels on the Bartram Trail

Spider by Beth Thompson: from Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail

Except, when I got close to a bee, it was at the Georgia State Botanical Gardens in Athens GA, with no beach or spider anywhere in the image, and it certainly wasn’t feeding on a native plant. Although, according to Bartram, honeybees are a European import to the New World as well as wisteria; which originated in Japan.

Bee by Beth Thompson: from Beth's Travels on the Bartram Trail

Bee by Beth Thompson: from Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail

And finally, when I photographed a lizard, it was on a lovely vacation with my new fiancé, in a most unnatural environment atop a butterfly house in Brookgreen Gardens. And the last thing on my mind was taking pictures for Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail.

Lizard by Beth Thompson

Lizard by Beth Thompson

As for the Giant Hibiscus? Those don’t really exist—or do they?

The Gian Hibiscus by Beth Thompson: from Beth's Travels on the Bartram Trail

The Giant Hibiscus by Beth Thompson: from Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail

The End of a Journey….

So now I am coming to the end of a journey, a journey begun with a library book written by a century’s long dead person and a dream about walking out of this world and into another through a Giant Hibiscus Flower.  While there may or may not have been any hibiscus involved, my life has changed as I navigated my inner and outer worlds with William Bartram as a muse.
I have experienced loss, which wove its way into the blog with my grandfather’s passing. I have experienced love and am still learning about commitment with my fiancé. I have found my voice in my writing and developed an extensive body of work called Possible Perceptions. I have been blessed with a family that has journeyed with me on the Bartram Trail.  I have learned that when I take the time to slow down, whether its by taking a tripod and shooting slowly in the forest moving from tree to tree, or by spending a day journaling and walking and connecting with loved ones rather than work, I create better, live my life better, connect with others better. That is to say, when I take the time to slow down, I am better. I have learned that when I think I have nothing to say, and I sit down to write anyway, I always fill up the page.

Here is that Spider from the Birds of Prey Center in South Carolina hunting the Bee on the wisteria at The Botanical Gardens in Athens, GA.

Bee and Spider by Beth Thompson: from Beth's Travels on the Bartram Trail

Bee and Spider by Beth Thompson: from Beth’s Travels on the Bartram Trail

And here is Bee and Spider Possible Perception.

Bee and Spider Possible Perception by Beth Thompson

Bee and Spider Possible Perception by Beth Thompson

“Beth’s Journey on the Bartram Trail” will continue to post 52, which will be released in conjunction with my October 2015 Show at the Botanical Gardens, an exhibition titled “Travels on the William Bartram Trail: Beth Thompson’s Possible Perceptions.”

*Opening Stanza of reading from”The Slacks” by Trip Shakespeare.

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